Sunday, July 12, 2020

SOURCE AND TRANSPORT OF ARSENIC IN THE MEKONG DELTA’S AQUIFERS



Quang M. Nguyen
July 7, 2020

Villagers in rural Cambodia use groundwater with arsenic concentrations above allowable levels. [Source: Scott Fendorf]

Introduction

Arsenic in groundwater is considered as a thread to human health, affecting approximately 137 million people in 70 countries [1].  In the Mekong delta – including the floodplains in Cambodia and Vietnam – arsenic is found in the alluvia deposited by sediments carried downstream from the Himalayas in form of iron oxides.  From there, arsenic is released into groundwater through microbial reduction and chemical dissolution [2].  Arsenic with elevated concentrations is detected in the Holocene Alluvium and Pleistocene Alluvium in the deltas across South and Southeast Asia in India [3], Nepal, West Bengal, Bangladesh, Cambodia and Vietnam (in the Red delta in the North and the Mekong delta in the South (MD/V)) [4].  In the MD/V, besides the shallow Holocene and Pleistocene aquifers, arsenic with high concentrations is also found in the deep Pliocene and Miocene aquifers.

The presence of arsenic in the Holocene and Pleistocene aquifers has long been understood, but its presence in the Pliocene and Miocene aquifers in the MD/V remained a “mystery” until the 2000s with new findings from scientists.  This article analyzes these findings in an attempt to understand the source and transport of arsenic in the Pliocene and Miocene aquifers in the MD/V.

Geology and hydrogeology of the MDV

The presence of arsenic in groundwater in the deep aquifers in the MD/V depends on the geology and hydrogeology of the region.  Groundwater cannot flow through the impermeable clay layers, but it can flow easily in the permeable sand layers or aquifers under a difference in hydraulic heads or pressure.


Figure 1: The Mekong delta in Vietnam [5]

The MD/V is created by layers of ancient sediments at depth and those of more recent at or near the ground surface.  These layers of sediments comprise of layers of sand (permeable) and clay (impermeable).  A cross section of the MD/V from the Cambodia-Vietnam border to the ocean, as shown in Figure 2, shows that the Pleistocene and Pliocene aquifers have increasing thickness toward the ocean.  The Pleistocene aquifer, at a depth ranging from 20 m to 90 m below ground surface (bgs) at the border, reaches a depth ranging from 100 m to 200 m bgs at the ocean.  Similarly, the Pliocene aquifer, at a depth ranging from 130 m to 180 m bgs at the border, reaches a depth ranging from 240 m to 400 m at the ocean.  Based on this inclination, the Pleistocene and Pliocene aquifers appear to reach the ground surface in Cambodia and commingle with the Holocene aquifer without interbedded clay layers.

Figure 2: Geology of the MD/V at Section AA’ (Figure 1) along the Mekong river [5]

Since the deep aquifers in the MD/V are connected with the shallow aquifers in Cambodia, they have very high pressure.  Water levels in wells drilled into these deep aquifers rise very close to the ground surface, ranging from 1 m to 3 m bgs, as shown in Figure 3.  These water levels are consistent with those in the shallow aquifers in Cambodia at elevation about 2 m, as shown in Figure 4.  As a result, groundwater in these shallow aquifers migrates into the deep aquifers in the MD/V toward the ocean.

Figure 3: Groundwater levels in the MD/V [4]

Figure 4: Groundwater levels in the Mekong delta in Cambodia (MD/C) [6]

Fendorf  Investigation

Scientists had long confirmed that arsenic, in the deltas across South and Southeast Asia, originates from arsenic-laden rocks in the Himalayas carried downstream by the rivers in the region.  However, the presence of arsenic in the deep aquifers remains a mystery.

In order to unveil this mystery, Dr. Scott Fendorf, a professor of environmental Earth system science and a senior fellow at Stanford University's Woods Institute for the Environment, and two colleagues, Chris Francis, an assistant professor of geological and environmental sciences, and Karen Seto, now at Yale University, launched a field study in Asia in 2004.  They began their investigation in the Brahmaputra River delta in Bangladesh, but the groundwater flow there is highly influenced by irrigation wells; therefore, they moved their work to the MD/C, which was chemically, biologically and geologically similar to Bangladesh but mostly undeveloped, as shown in Figure 5.

Figure 5: Stanford University’s research team in Cambodia
 led by Dr. Scott Fendorf (white shirt) [Sources: Stanford University]

In 2009, they concluded that arsenic in sediments transported down by the Mekong river from the Himalayas was released within the first 2 to 3 feet (less than 1 m) bgs and entered the water.  They estimated that it would take at least 100 years to migrate down into the aquifers below.  They also showed that the 100-year migration of arsenic into the deep aquifers was a natural process that had been occurring for thousands of years. [7]

Although the Fendorf findings are consistent with current understanding of the source of arsenic in the Mekong delta, they contradict with the principles of hydrogeology when stating that arsenic in water migrates down into deep aquifers across the clay layers.  This cannot happen because the deep aquifers are confined with very high pressures.

Erban Hypothesis

In 2013, in her “Dissertation Submitted to the Department of Environmental Earth System Science and the Committee on Graduate Studies of Stanford University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy” [8], Dr. Laura Erban used a three-dimensional model to prove that “when low-arsenic, deep aquifers were over-pumped during recent decades, clay compaction began, leading to water containing arsenic and possibly other, arsenic-mobilizing solutes being squeezed out of dead-flow storage to adjacent aquifers, a process taking a decade or more.”  This hypothesis was also presented in the Proceedings of the National of Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) in the same year [4].


Figure 6: Erban hypothesis [4]

Figure 7: Pollution of arsenic in the MD/V [4]

According to available data, groundwater contaminated with high concentration of arsenic in the MD/V is common along the Mekong river between the border and the city of Can Tho.  As shown in Figure 7, wells with arsenic concentrations above 100 µg/l are not located within areas of large land subsidence rate, as shown in Figure 8.  Therefore, the Erban hypothesis does not seem scientifically justified.


Figure 8: Simulated land subsidence in the MD/V [5]

Another shortcoming of the Erban hypothesis relates to the amount and concentration of “arsenic-mobilizing solutes of dead-flow storage” in the clay layers that were squeezed out into the deep aquifer.

According to Dr. Erban, “The porewater concentrations of arsenic and arsenic-mobilizing solutes in deep confining clays of the Mekong Delta are not explicitly known, but available evidence suggests they may be high in arsenic-prone regions.  Support for high solute concentrations in deep clays derives from a) dissolved arsenic concentrations in shallow clays of the Delta, deposited under similar paleoclimatic conditions, b) dissolved solute concentrations in confining clays in other regions of similar and older age, and c) consideration of the timescales for loss of arsenic from deep clays in the Delta context.” [8] However, arsenic concentrations in the shallow clays in the MD/V do not exceed 1,000 µg/l while the arsenic concentrations of the deep aquifers may reach 1,500 µg/l.  The “other regions of similar and older age” are located outside a delta in North and Central America.

Since the effective porosity of the clay layers is very small, these clay layers cannot contain enough water with high arsenic concentrations to contaminate the adjacent aquifers, if it is squeezed out of the clay.

A reasonable explanation

Based on the geological structure and hydrogeological conditions, as mentioned above, together with the arsenic concentrations in the MD/C, as shown in Figure 9 - with arsenic concentrations in some wells may reach 6,000 µg/l [9] - it can be concluded that arsenic in the deep Pliocene and Miocene aquifers in the MD/V originates from the shallow Holocene aquifer in the MD/C.  From there, arsenic migrates down into the Pliocene and Miocene aquifers and then toward the MD/V.

Figure 9: Arsenic in the Mekong delta in Cambodia [6]

If the deep Pliocene and Miocene aquifers have an average hydraulic conductivity or permeability) K = 3.15x10-4 m/sec (9.934 km/yr) [10], an effective porosity Θ = 0.17 [8] and an average hydraulic head along the Mekong river from Phnom Penh, Cambodia to Can Tho, Vietnam i = 2.1x10-3 (a difference in elevations of 400 m in a distance of 190 km measured on Google Map); the average velocity of groundwater in the deep Pliocene and Miocene aquifers is approximately 123 m/yr (v = Ki/Θ).  As a result, arsenic would take about 2,000 years to reach groundwater in the deep aquifers underneath Can Tho.

Summary and conclusion

Arsenic-laden rocks from the Himalayas were carried downstream by sediments in the Mekong river and deposited in the delta alluvia.  Arsenic with elevated concentrations is found in the Holocene and Pleistocene aquifers in the deltas across South and Southeast Asia.  In part of the Mekong delta in Vietnam, arsenic is also found in the deep Pliocene and Miocene aquifers and remains a “mystery” until the 2000s.

To unveil this mystery, the scientists from Stanford University conducted a field study in Cambodia in 2004.  They concluded that arsenic in the sediments from the Himalayas was released to the water within the first 2 to 3 feet below ground surface and took at least 100 years to migrate down into the aquifers below.  This finding contradicts with the principles of hydrogeology because water cannot migrate across the clay layers into the deep aquifers under confined conditions with very high pressures.

The presence of arsenic in the deep Pliocene and Miocene aquifers was also thought to be squeezed out of the interbedded clay layers, due to land subsidence resulting from decades of groundwater extraction.  However, this hypothesis is not supported by scientific evidence.

Based on the geological structure, hydrogeological conditions, and arsenic concentrations in the Mekong delta, a reasonable explanation for the presence of arsenic in the deep Pliocene and Miocene aquifers is that it originates from the shallow Holocene aquifer in Cambodia, and migrates down then toward the deep Pliocene and Miocene aquifers in Vietnam.  It may take approximately 2,000 years to reach the city of Can Tho.

About the author

Quang M. Nguyen was a professional engineer of the States of Florida and California.  He worked for the National Water Resources Commission in Saigon, Vietnam; the Broward County’s Water Resources Management Division in Florida; and the Stetson Engineers Inc. in Los Angeles County, California, specializing in water resources and groundwater contamination.  He retired in 2016.

References

[1]       Associated Press. August 30, 2007.  “Arsenic in drinking water seen as threat.”  USA Today. http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/world/2007-08-30-553404631_x.htm
[2]       Fendorf, S., Holly A. Michael, and Alexander van Green.  28 May 2010.  “Spatial and Temporal Variations of Groundwater Arsenic in South and Southeast Asia.”  Science.  Vol. 328; pp. 1123-1127. https://science.sciencemag.org/content/328/5982/1123.full
[3]       Babar Ali Shah. 25 May 2010. “Arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Holocene sediments from parts of Middle Ganga Plain, Uttar Pradesh, India.  Current Science.  Vol. 98, No. 10, pp. 1359-1365. http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/files/Arsenic%20contaminated%20groundwater%20in%20Holocene%20sediments.pdf
[4]       Erban, E. Laura, Steven M. Gorelick, Howard A. Zebker, and Scott Fendorf.  August 20, 2013.  “Release of arsenic to deep groundwater in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, linked to pumping-induced land subsidence.”  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.  Vol. 110, No. 34, pp. 13751-13756. https://www.pnas.org/content/110/34/13751
[5]       P S J Minderhoud, et al. 1 June 2017.  “Impacts of 25 years of groundwater extraction on subsidence in the Mekong delta, Vietnam.”  Environmental Research Letters.  https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aa7146/pdf
[6]       Felix Seebacher.  2 April 2014.  Groundwater in the Mekong Region-Transboundary Aquifers.  Mekong River Commission.  https://data.opendevelopmentmekong.net/dataset/31218536-bb7d-4439-9742-aaf786e14c01/resource/095025a9-a324-43fd-bdb8-1b459bb4def3/download/2.2-c-groundwater-ingmekong-region-felixseebacher.pdf
[7]       Chelsea Anne Young.  March 24, 2009.  “Scientists solve puzzle of arsenic poisoning crisis in Asia.”  Stanford Report. https://news.stanford.edu/news/2009/april1/fendorf-arsenic-water-poison-asia-040109.html
[8]       Laura E. Erban.  December 2013.  Groundwater Exploitation and Arsenic Occurrence in the Mekong Delta Aquifer System.  A Dissertation Submitted to the Department of Environmental Earth System Science and the Committee on Graduate Studies of Stanford University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy.  Stanford University.  https://stacks.stanford.edu/file/druid:fx861nd2581/LErban_Dissertation_Final-augmented.pdf
[9]       Kang Yumei.  28 January 2016.  “Arsenic-Polluted Groundwater in Cambodia: Advances in Research.”  International Journal of Water and Wastewater Treatment.  https://www.sciforschenonline.org/journals/water-and-waste/article-data/IJWWWT-2-116/IJWWWT-2-116.pdf
[10]     Benner, Shawn G. et al.  2008.  “Groundwater flow in an arsenic-contaminated aquifer, Mekong Delta, Cambodia.”  https://www.academia.edu/11992776/Groundwater_flow_in_an_arsenic-contaminated_aquifer_Mekong_Delta_Cambodia


.

NGUỒN GỐC VÀ SỰ DI CHUYỂN CỦA ARSENIC TRONG NƯỚC NGẦM Ở VÙNG CHÂU THỔ SÔNG MEKONG



Nguyễn Minh Quang
7 tháng 7 năm 2020

Người dân ở nông thôn Cambodia sử dụng nước giếng 
có nồng độ arsenic trên mức cho phép. [Ảnh: Scott Fendorf]

Phần dẫn nhập

Arsenic trong nước ngầm được xem là mối đe dọa đến sức khỏe của khoảng 137 triệu người trong 70 quốc gia [1].  Trong vùng châu thổ sông Mekong – vùng ngập lụt phía dưới Kratie bao gồm một phần của Cambodia và Đồng bằng sông Cửu Long của Việt Nam (ĐBSCL) – arsenic nằm trong các lớp trầm tích, do do sự lắng đọng của phù sa phát xuất từ dãy Himalayas dưới dạng iron oxides.  Từ đó arsenic được phóng thích vào nước ngầm qua phản ứng sinh học hay sự phân hủy của iron oxides [2].  Arsenic được tìm thấy với nồng độ cao trong các lớp trầm tích cận đại (Holocene Alluvium) và trung đại (Pleistocene Alluvium) trong các châu thổ ở Nam và Đông Nam Á (ĐNA) như ở Ấn Độ [3], Nepal, West Bengal, Bangladesh, Cambodia và Việt Nam (sông Hồng và sông Cửu Long) [4].  Đặc biệt ở ĐBSCL, ngoài các lớp trầm tích cận và trung đại, arsenic có nồng độ cao còn được tìm thấy trong nước ngầm trong các lớp trầm tích cổ đại (Pliocene Alluvium và Miocene Alluvium) nằm sâu ở dưới đất.

Sự hiện diện của arsenic trong các lớp trầm tích cận và trung đại tương đối dễ hiểu, nhưng sự hiện diện của nó trong các lớp trầm tích cổ đại ở ĐBSCL vẫn còn là một “bí mật” chưa được giải thích một cách khoa học cho đến thập niên 2000s.  Bài viết nầy có mục đích tìm hiểu về nguồn gốc của arsenic cũng như sự hiện diện của nó trong các lớp trầm tích cổ đại qua việc phân tích cái “bí mật” vừa được các khoa học gia giải mật.

Địa chất và địa thủy học của ĐBSCL

Sự hiện diện của arsenic trong nước ngầm trong các lớp trầm tích ở ĐBSCL tùy thuộc vào địa chất và địa thủy học (geohydrology) ở trong vùng, vì nước ngầm không thể chảy qua các lớp đất sét mà chỉ có thể chảy trong các lớp cát sạn từ nơi có thủy thế (hay áp suất) cao đến nơi có thủy thế thấp. 
Hình 1: Đồng bằng sông Cửu Long. [5]

ĐBSCL được cấu tạo bởi nhiều lớp trầm tích từ thời cổ đại, nằm sâu ở dưới mặt đất, đến thời cận đại nằm gần mặt đất.  Các lớp trầm tích nầy gồm có những lớp cát sạn (thấm nước) xen lẫn với các lớp đất sét (không thấm nước).  Một mặt cắt ngang ĐBSCL từ biên giới với Cambodia đến bờ Biển Đông cho thấy các lớp trầm tích trung đại (Pleistocene Alluvium) và cổ đại (Pliocene Alluvium) càng ngày càng dầy hơn và ở sâu hơn khi tiến ra biển.  Lớp trầm tích trung đại (Pleistocene Alluvium) có chiều sâu từ khoảng 20 m đến 90 m ở biên giới Việt-Miên và khoảng 100 m đến 200 m ở bờ biển Đông.  Lớp trầm tích cổ đại (Pliocene Alluvium) có chiều sâu khoảng 130 m đến 180 m ở biên giới Việt-Miên và 240 m đến 400 m ở bờ biển.  Dựa trên độ dốc nầy, các lớp trầm tích trung và cổ đại có thể đi đến gần mặt đất và liên kết với lớp trầm tích cận đại (Holocence Alluvium) mà không bị các lớp đất sét xen vào.


Hình 2: Địa chất của ĐBSCL ở mặt cắt AA’ (Hình 1) dọc theo sông Tiền. [5]

Vì các lớp trầm tích ở ĐBSCL là một phần của các lớp trầm tích trong châu thổ sông Mekong phát xuất từ mặt đất ở Cambodia, chúng chịu một áp suất rất cao.  Vì thế, mực nước ngầm trong các giếng khoan đến các tầng nước ngầm ở ĐBSCL dâng lên rất cao, có cao độ từ -1 m đến -3 m trong điều kiện tự nhiên (Hình 3).  Nó tương ứng với mực nước ngầm trong các lớp trầm tích ở Cambodia có cao độ trên + 2m (Hình 4); vì thế, nước ngầm trong các lớp trầm tích nầy di chuyển từ Cambodia qua Việt Nam rồi đổ ra Biển Đông.

Hình 3: Mực nước ngầm ở ĐBSCL. [4]

Hình 4: Mực nước ngầm ở châu thổ Mekong, Cambodia. [6]

Nghiên cứu của Fendorf

Từ lâu, các nhà khoa học đã xác định được rằng arsenic hiện diện trong các châu thổ sông ở Nam Á và ĐNA phát xuất từ vùng Himalayas và được phù sa mang theo xuống hạ lưu; nhưng họ vẫn không biết tại sao arsenic hiện diện trong các tầng nước ngầm ở sâu dưới mặt đất.

Để tìm hiểu điều bí ẩn nầy, Tiến sĩ (TS) Scott Fendorf, giáo sư Khoa học Môi trường Địa cầu của Đại học Stanford, cùng 2 đồng nghiệp Chris Francis và Karen Seto, đã thực hiện việc nghiên cứu thực địa ở Á Châu từ năm 2004.  Họ bắt đầu việc nghiên cứu trong lưu vực sông Bramaputra ở Bangladesh, nhưng sự di chuyển của nước ngầm ở đây bị ảnh hưởng của nhiều giếng thủy nông, họ quyết định chuyển sang lưu vực Mekong ở Cambodia, nơi có các điều kiện địa chất tương tự như lưu vực Bramaputra nhưng chưa bị ảnh hưởng (Hình 5).

Hình 5: Nhóm nghiên cứu của Đại học Stanford ở Cambodia 
dưới sự hướng dẫn của TS Scott Fendorf (áo trắng). [Ảnh: Stanford]

Năm 2009, họ đi đến kết luận rằng arsenic trong phù sa được sông Mekong chuyển xuống từ dãy Himalayas được phóng thích ở rất gần mặt đất, khoảng từ 2 feet đến 3 feet (dưới 1m), rồi thấm xuống các tầng nước ngầm ở bên dưới và có thể mất ít nhất 100 năm để đến các tầng nước ngầm ở sâu dưới đất.  Họ cũng cho biết thêm là chu kỳ di chuyển hàng trăm năm của arsenic xuống các tầng nước ngầm là một tiến trình tự nhiên đã xảy ra từ nhiều ngàn năm trước khi có ảnh hưởng của con người [7].

Mặc dù kết quả nghiên cứu của Fendorf phù hợp với các dữ kiện thu thập được về nguồn gốc của arsenic trong châu thổ sông Mekong, nó đi ngược với nguyên tắc của địa thủy học trong khu vực khi cho rằng arsenic thấm xuống các tầng nước ngầm ở dưới sâu qua các lớp đất sét.  Điều nầy không thể xảy ra vì các tầng nước ngầm trong các lớp trầm tích trung và cổ đại có áp suất rất cao.

Giả thuyết của Erban

Vào năm 2013, trong luận án tiến sĩ đệ trình lên Khoa Khoa học Môi trường Địa cầu ở Đại học Stanford [8], TS Laura Erban đã dùng một mô hình 3 chiều để chứng minh giả thuyết cho rằng việc khai thác nước ngầm trong các lớp trầm tích trung và cổ đại gây sụt lún đất, khiến cho các lớp đất sét nằm xen kẽ trong các tầng nước ngầm bị nén lại và đẩy nước có chứa arsenic trong các lớp đất sét vào các tầng nước ngầm ở dưới sâu trong nhiều thập niên.  Giả thuyết nầy cũng được trình bày trong một bài viết trên Proceedings of the National of Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) trong cùng năm [4].

Hình 6: Giả thuyết của Erban. [4]

Hình 7: Ô nhiễm arsenic ở ĐBSCL. [4]

Theo dữ kiện đo đạc, nước ngầm ô nhiễm arsenic ở nồng độ cao trong ĐBSCL tập trung dọc sông Tiền và Hậu từ biên giới Việt-Miên đến Cần Thơ.   Như được mô tả trong Hình 7, các giếng có nồng độ arsenic cao hơn 100 µg/l thì không nằm trong vùng bị sụt lún nhiều nhất như được mô tả trong Hình 8; vì thế, giả thuyết của Erban không có tính thuyết phục khoa học.

Hình 8: Ước tính mức sụt lún đất ở ĐBSCL. [5]

Một điểm yếu khác trong giả thuyết của Erban là nồng độ và số lượng của nước ngầm nằm trong các lớp đất sét xen kẽ với các tầng nước ngầm trong các lớp trầm tích trung và cổ đại ở ĐBSCL.

“… nồng độ và tính di động của arsenic trong các lớp đất sét xen kẽ với các tầng nước ngầm ở sâu dưới đất không được biết một cách rõ ràng… nồng độ arsenic cao trong các lớp đất sét được suy ra từ a) nồng độ arsenic hòa tan trong đất sét ở gần mặt đất trong ĐBSCL, b) nồng độ arsenic hòa tan trong các lớp đất sét ở các vùng tương tự khác và lâu đời hơn, và c) thời biểu của sự phóng thích arsenic từ các lớp đất sét ở dưới sâu trong khung cảnh của châu thổ.” [8] Nhưng nồng độ arsenic trong nước nằm trong các lớp đất sét ở gần mặt đất không vượt quá 1.000 µg/l, trong khi nồng độ arsenic trong các giếng ở ĐBSCL có thể lên đến 1.500 µg/l.  Các vùng “tương tự khác” thì nằm ở Bắc và Trung Mỹ và không phải là châu thổ.

Vì độ rỗng hiệu dụng (effective porosity) của đất sét rất nhỏ, nên các lớp đất sét xen kẽ với các tầng nước ngầm không thể chứa một số lượng nước có nồng độ arsenic cao đủ lớn để có thể làm ô nhiểm các tầng nước ngầm kế cận, nếu nó bị đẩy ra khỏi lớp đất sét.

Một giải thích hợp lý hơn

Dựa trên cấu tạo địa chất và các điều kiện địa thủy học được mô tả ở trên, cùng với tình trạng ô nhiễm arsenic dọc theo sông Mekong trên lãnh thổ Cambodia như được mô tả trong Hình 9 - với một số giếng có nồng độ arsenic lên đến 6.000 µg/l [9] – chúng ta có thể kết luận rằng arsenic trong các tầng nước ngầm trung và cổ đại ở ĐBSCL phát xuất từ tầng nước ngầm cận đại dọc theo sông Mekong trong lãnh thổ Cambodia.  Từ đó, arsenic thấm xuống các tầng nước ngầm trung và cổ đại rồi lan vào ĐBSCL.

Hình 9: Arsenic trong châu thổ Mekong ở Cambodia. [6]

Nếu các tầng nước ngầm trung và cổ đại có độ dẫn thủy lực hay độ thấm (hydraulic conductivity hay permeability) trung bình K = 3,15x10-4 m/sec (9,934 km/yr) [10] với một độ dốc thủy lực (hydraulic head) trung bình dọc theo sông Mekong từ Phnom Penh, Cambodia đến Cần Thơ, Việt Nam là i = 2,1x10-3 (sai biệt cao độ khoảng 400 m trong 190 km đo được trên Google Map); vận tốc trung bình của nước ngầm trong các tầng nước ngầm trung cổ đại Pliocene-Miocene vào khoảng 21 m/yr.  Như vậy, arsenic phải mất khoảng 11.000 năm mới đến các tầng nước ngầm nầy ở bên dưới Cần Thơ.

Phần kết luận

Arsenic phát xuất từ dãy Himalayas rồi theo phù sa trong sông di chuyển xuống hạ lưu.  Nó được tìm thấy với nồng độ cao trong nước ngầm của các lớp trầm tích cận đại ở gần mặt đất trong hầu hết các châu thổ ở Nam và ĐNA.  Riêng ở ĐBSCL, arsenic cũng hiện diện trong nước ngầm của các lớp trầm tích cổ đại ở sâu dưới đất và là một “bí mật” chưa được giải thích một cách khoa học cho đến thập niên 2000s.

Để tìm hiểu về sự bí mật nầy, các nhà khoa học của Đại học Stanford đã thực hiện một cuộc nghiên cứu tại chỗ ở Cambodia.  Họ đi đến kết luận rằng arsenic trong phù sa, được sông Mekong chuyển xuống từ dãy Himalayas, được phóng thích ở rất gần mặt đất, rồi thấm xuống các tầng nước ngầm ở bên dưới và có thể mất ít nhất 100 năm để đến các tầng nước ngầm ở sâu dưới đất.  Nhưng kết luận nầy đi ngược với nguyên tắc của địa thủy học vì nước ngầm không thể thấm vào các tầng nước ngầm trung cổ đại có áp suất rất cao.

Sự hiện diện của arsenic trong các tầng nước ngầm trung cổ đại cũng được cho là do arsenic trong các lớp đất sét được phóng thích vào các tầng nước ngầm, vì các lớp đất sét bị nén lại cùng với sự sụt lún đất do khai thác nước ngầm.  Nhưng giả thuyết nầy không có bằng chứng khoa học vững chắc để minh chứng.

Dựa trên cấu tạo địa chất và các điều kiện địa thủy học của châu thổ sông Mekong và mức độ ô nhiễm arsenic quan sát được, chúng ta có thể kết luận rằng arsenic trong các tầng nước ngầm trung cổ đại ở ĐBSCL phát xuất từ tầng nước ngầm cận đại dọc theo sông Mekong trong lãnh thổ Cambodia.  Từ đó, arsenic thấm xuống các tầng nước ngầm trung và cổ đại rồi lan vào ĐBSCL.

Sơ lược về tác giả

Tác giả nguyên là Kỹ sư Công chánh Chuyên nghiệp (Professional Civil Engineer) của tiểu bang Florida và California.  Tốt nghiệp Kỹ sư Công chánh tại Trường Cao đẳng Công chánh, Trung tâm Quốc gia Kỹ Thuật Phú Thọ, Sài Gòn năm 1972.  Trưởng ty Kế hoạch, Ủy ban Quốc gia Thủy lợi, Bộ Công chánh và Giao thông, Sài Gòn đến tháng 4 năm 1975.  Tốt nghiệp Kỹ sư Công chánh (1983) và Cao học Thủy lợi (1985) tại Đại học Nebraska, Hoa Kỳ.  Chuyên viên Thủy học (Hydrlogist) của Sở Quản trị Thủy lợi, Broward County, Florida đến năm 1989.  Từ năm 1990 đến 2015, Kỹ sư Giám sát Trưởng (Senior Supervising Engineer) của Stetson Engineers Inc., một công ty cố vấn về thủy lợi và ô nhiễm nguồn nước, thành lập năm 1957 ở Los Angeles.  Về hưu từ năm 2016.

Tài liệu tham khảo

[1]       Associated Press. August 30, 2007.  “Arsenic in drinking water seen as threat.”  USA Today. http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/world/2007-08-30-553404631_x.htm
[2]       Fendorf, S., Holly A. Michael, and Alexander van Green.  28 May 2010.  “Spatial and Temporal Variations of Groundwater Arsenic in South and Southeast Asia.”  Science.  Vol. 328; pp. 1123-1127. https://science.sciencemag.org/content/328/5982/1123.full
[3]       Babar Ali Shah. 25 May 2010. “Arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Holocene sediments from parts of Middle Ganga Plain, Uttar Pradesh, India.  Current Science.  Vol. 98, No. 10, pp. 1359-1365. http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/files/Arsenic%20contaminated%20groundwater%20in%20Holocene%20sediments.pdf
[4]       Erban, E. Laura, Steven M. Gorelick, Howard A. Zebker, and Scott Fendorf.  August 20, 2013.  “Release of arsenic to deep groundwater in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, linked to pumping-induced land subsidence.”  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.  Vol. 110, No. 34, pp. 13751-13756. https://www.pnas.org/content/110/34/13751
[5]       P S J Minderhoud, et al. 1 June 2017.  “Impacts of 25 years of groundwater extraction on subsidence in the Mekong delta, Vietnam.”  Environmental Research Letters.  https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aa7146/pdf
[6]       Felix Seebacher.  2 April 2014.  Groundwater in the Mekong Region-Transboundary Aquifers.  Mekong River Commission.  https://data.opendevelopmentmekong.net/dataset/31218536-bb7d-4439-9742-aaf786e14c01/resource/095025a9-a324-43fd-bdb8-1b459bb4def3/download/2.2-c-groundwater-ingmekong-region-felixseebacher.pdf
[7]       Chelsea Anne Young.  March 24, 2009.  “Scientists solve puzzle of arsenic poisoning crisis in Asia.”  Stanford Report. https://news.stanford.edu/news/2009/april1/fendorf-arsenic-water-poison-asia-040109.html
[8]       Laura E. Erban.  December 2013.  Groundwater Exploitation and Arsenic Occurrence in the Mekong Delta Aquifer System.  A Dissertation Submitted to the Department of Environmental Earth System Science and the Committee on Graduate Studies of Stanford University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy.  Stanford University.  https://stacks.stanford.edu/file/druid:fx861nd2581/LErban_Dissertation_Final-augmented.pdf
[9]       Kang Yumei.  28 January 2016.  “Arsenic-Polluted Groundwater in Cambodia: Advances in Research.”  International Journal of Water and Wastewater Treatment.  https://www.sciforschenonline.org/journals/water-and-waste/article-data/IJWWWT-2-116/IJWWWT-2-116.pdf
[10]     Benner, Shawn G. et al.  2008.  “Groundwater flow in an arsenic-contaminated aquifer, Mekong Delta, Cambodia.”  https://www.academia.edu/11992776/Groundwater_flow_in_an_arsenic-contaminated_aquifer_Mekong_Delta_Cambodia

.

Saturday, July 11, 2020

TRUNG HOA VẬN DỤNG NGUỒN NƯỚC PHONG PHÚ CỦA CAO NGUYÊN TÂY TẠNG


China Leverages Tibetan Plateau’s Water Wealth

Brahma Chellany – Bình Yên Đông lược dịch
India Blooms – 2 July 2020



Trong lúc quốc tế vẫn lưu ý đến các hoạt động phi pháp của Trung Hoa trong vùng tranh chấp ở Biển Đông, nơi nước nầy tiếp tục bành trướng vết chân chiến lược của mình, Bắc Kinh cũng âm thầm chú trọng đến các sông bắt nguồn từ vùng giàu tài nguyên trong lãnh thổ Tây Tạng do Trung Hoa kiểm soát.

Trung Hoa, từ lâu, đã theo đuổi một chiến lược lớn lao để thu vét tài nguyên thiên nhiên.  Điều nầy đã thúc đẩy sự hiện diện ngày càng tăng ở những nơi xa xôi, bao gồm Phi Châu và Mỹ La tinh.  Đam mê mới nhất của Trung Hoa là nước ngọt, một tài nguyên tạo nên và hỗ trợ cho đời sống, mà tình trạng khan hiếm ngày càng tăng đang làm mất tin tưởng vào tương lai kinh tế của Á Châu.

Hầu hết các sông lớn ở Á Châu bắt nguồn từ Cao nguyên Tây Tạng.  Từ đó, chúng chảy qua hàng chục quốc gia, kể cả lục địa Trung Hoa.  Với địa hình cao ngất, nổi bật qua các đỉnh núi cao nhất thế giới và nơi tập trung nhiều nhất các băng hà và đầu nguồn, Cao nguyên Tây Tạng ảnh hưởng đến sự vận chuyển của khí quyển – và, do đó, khí hậu và thời tiết – trên khắp Bắc Bán cầu.
Cao nguyên Tây Tạng. [Ảnh: Inam Water World]

Ngày nay, Trung Hoa biến cái cao nguyên mong manh về sinh thái, mà họ xâm lấn và chiếm đóng từ 1950 đến 1951, thành trung tâm của các hoạt động khai mỏ và xây đập.  Với mức hâm nóng nhanh gấp 3 lần mức trung bình toàn cầu, theo dữ kiện của Trung Hoa, sự thối lui của băng hà, nhất là ở miền đông Himalayas, và sự tan chảy của lớp đất đóng băng ở Tây Tạng đã gia tăng tốc độ.

Hậu quả nhiều hơn cho các quốc gia ở hạ lưu là việc Trung Hoa, bằng cách xây các đập khổng lồ và các công trình chuyển nước trên các sông quốc tế bắt nguồn từ Tây Tạng, đang trở thành người kiểm soát nước thượng nguồn ở Á Châu.  Hành động nầy trang bị cho Bắc Kinh một lực đòn bẫy ngày càng tăng đối với các quốc gia tùy thuộc vào dòng chảy của sông từ Cao nguyên Tây Tạng.

Thí dụ như sông Mekong, mạch sống của lục địa Đông Nam Á (ĐNA).  Một nghiên cứu mới của Hoa Kỳ xác nhận cái mà nhiều người ở trong vùng đã biết – rằng Trung Hoa đang ngăn dòng Mekong đến địa ngục môi trường.  Theo nghiên cứu nầy, chuổi đập khổng lồ của Trung Hoa, bằng cách hạn chế dòng chảy xuống hạ lưu, đang gây hạn hán định kỳ ở Thái Lan, Lào, Cambodia và Việt Nam vì dòng chảy ở hạ lưu bị hạn chế.  Sử dụng mô hình dữ kiện dòng chảy tự nhiên, nghiên cứu cho thấy 11 đập khổng lồ của Trung Hoa đang hoạt động trên sông Mekong đang gây hạn hán nghiêm trọng và tàn phá ở hạ lưu.  Nhưng một Trung Hoa không nao núng đang xây thêm các đập khổng lồ trên sông Mekong ngay trước khi nó chảy qua biên giới để vào ĐNA.  Nghiên cứu nầy được thực hiện bởi công ty cố vấn và nghiên cứu Eyes on Earth với sự tài trợ của Sáng kiến Hạ lưu Mekong (Lower Mekong Initiative (LMI)) của Bộ Ngoại giao.

Tây Tạng – cao nguyên cao nhất và rộng nhất thế giới – cũng là một kho tàng đáng giá của các tài nguyên khoáng sản, khiến cho Trung Hoa có dự trữ lớn nhất của 10 kim loại khác nhau và là nước sản xuất lithium lớn nhất thế giới.  Ngày nay, Tây Tạng là tiêu điểm của các hoạt động khai mỏ và xây đập của Trung Hoa, đe dọa hệ sinh thái mong manh của cao nguyên và các chủng loại địa phương.  Tây Tạng vẫn là trọng tâm của sự chia rẽ Trung Hoa-Ấn Độ, châm ngòi cho các tranh chấp lãnh thổ, căng thẳng ngoại giao, và thù hận về dòng chảy của sông.  Trong số các sông được các nhà xây đập Trung Hoa chiếu cố là Brahmaputra, mạch máu của Bangladesh và đông bắc Ấn Độ.  Một loạt đập đang được xây trên Brahmaputra, được gọi là Yarlung Tsangpo ở Tây Tạng.

Hành động đơn phương của Bắc Kinh vượt quá việc xây đập.  Năm 2017, Trung Hoa từ chối cung cấp dữ kiện thủy học cho Ấn Độ, vi phạm các điều khoản trong các thỏa ước song phương, đục khoét tính sẳn sàng để vũ khí hóa việc chia sẻ dữ kiện thủy học về dòng chảy của sông ở thượng lưu.  Sự từ chối nầy được cho là để trừng phạt Ấn Độ đã tẩy chay hội nghị thượng đỉnh khai mạc Vành đai và Con đường và đối đầu quân sự giữa 2 quốc gia trong năm ở Doklam, một vùng rất nhỏ nhưng quan trọng về chiến lược trên cao nguyên Himalayas.  Việc từ chối dữ kiện cản trở hệ thống báo lũ sớm của Ấn Độ.  Điều đó, lần lượt, gây chết người không thể tránh được khi Brahmaputra tràn bờ trong mùa mưa, để lại những tàn phá quan trọng, nhất là ở bang Assam của Ấn Độ.

Siang, một nhánh quan trọng của hệ thống sông Brahmaputra, là một thí dụ điển hình khác của các hành động đơn phương của Trung Hoa trên các sông quốc tế.  Năm 2017, nước sông Siang trở nên đục và xám đen khi dòng nước chảy vào Ấn Độ từ Tây Tạng.  Điều nầy gây lo ngại rằng các hoạt động ở thượng nguồn của Trung Hoa có thể đe dọa sông Siang tương tự như Bắc Kinh đã làm ô nhiễm các sông nội địa của họ, kể cả Hoàng Hà, cái nôi của nền văn minh Trung Hoa.  Gần 3 năm sau, nước trong sông Siang một thời ban sơ vẫn chưa trong hẵn.

Theo Aquastat, kho dữ liệu của Tổ chức Lương Nông Liên Hiệp Quốc, mỗi năm có 718 tỉ m3 nước mặt chảy ra khỏi Cao nguyên Tây Tạng và các vùng do Trung Hoa cai quản ở Xinjiang (Tân Cương) và Inner Mongolia (Nội Mông) đến các nước láng giềng.  Trong số đó, 48,33% chảy trực tiếp vào Ấn Độ.  Thêm vào đó, các sông ở Nepal bắt nguồn từ Tây Tạng cũng đổ vào lưu vực Ganges (Hằng) của Ấn Độ.  Điều nầy có thể cho thấy rằng không có quốc gia nào dễ bị tổn thương hơn Ấn Độ đối với trọng tâm xây chuỗi đập khổng lồ trên các sông quốc tế của Trung Hoa.  Trên thực tế, như việc xậy đập điên cuồng trên Mekong của Trung Hoa cho thấy, các lân bang nhỏ và dễ tổn thương về kinh tế là những nước nhạy cảm nhất với các hoạt động thủy điện ở thượng lưu.  Ảnh hưởng lớn nhất của việc xây đập trên Brahmaputra, chẳng hạn, không chỉ đổ xuống Ấn Độ mà còn xuống Bangladesh, nằm xa hơn về phía hạ lưu.

Từ lâu, Trung Hoa đứng đầu trên toàn cầu trong việc xây đập.  Họ đã nâng số đập lên trên ½ tổng số khoảng 58.000 đập lớn trên thế giới.  Nhưng việc “đổ xô vào đập” vẫn không ngừng.  Thêm nhiều đập được xây trên các sông quốc tế, các đập lớn hơn có khả năng để dùng nước xuyên biên giới như một công cụ ngoại giao cưỡng bức đối với các lân bang.  Mỗi đập mới gia tăng tiềm năng dùng các dòng sông chung như một vũ khí chánh trị của Trung Hoa, vì nó gia tăng khả năng điều tiết dòng chảy xuyên biên giới.  Lo ngại nầy được củng cố với sự từ chối của Trung Hoa để tham gia vào hiệp ước chia sẻ nước với bất cứ lân bang nào.  Ngay cả Ấn Độ và Pakistan cũng có một hiệp ước chia sẻ nước.

Vào lúc áp lực nước gia tăng ở Á Châu, sự lớn mạnh của chủ nghĩa quốc gia nước, động lực của các chánh sách của Trung Hoa, làm nổi bật sự liên kết giữa nước và hòa bình.  Các tổ chức hợp tác và sử dụng khả chấp tài nguyên là nền tảng của hòa bình nước.

Nếu Trung Hoa không từ bỏ đường lối hiện nay để hợp tác qua các tổ chức với các quốc gia trong cùng lưu vực, triễn vọng của một trật tự dựa trên luật lệ ở Á Châu có thể tàn lụi vĩnh viễn, trong khi các quốc gia hạ lưu có lẽ phải đối mặt với tương lai khô hạn nhiều hơn.  Á Châu chỉ có thể hình thành nước cho hòa bình nếu Trung Hoa nhập cuộc bằng đường lối minh bạch và cộng tác, đặt trọng tâm vào việc chia sẻ nước, dữ kiện thủy học liên tục, và các cơ chế giải quyết tranh chấp.

Brahma Chellaney là giáo sư nghiên cứu chiến lược của Nghiên cứu Chánh sách (Policy Research) có trụ sở ở New Delhi, một chuyên viên nghiên cứu độc lập, và tác giả của 9 quyển sách, gồm có Nước: Chiến trường Mới ở Á Châu (Water: Asia’s New Battleground) [Geortown University Press], đoạt Giải Bernard Schwartz.

 .